September 8 – October 7, 2012




Niklas Tafra, Alia Pathan, Sophia Pahud, Annie Peters, Nick Carr, Friederike Hamann, Tom Trevatt, Marc Geneix, Sam Basu, July Video Coalition

Curated by
Treignac Project 2012

•(You listening to) youtube.com/ watch?v=QSza93W6n1M•

News about the Apocalypse #6

What type of object is an apocalypse? What are its features, its conditions, its potentials? »(You listening to) youtube.com/watch?v=QSza93W6n1M« approaches the apocalypse not as a terrifying event of final revelation to be escaped, survived or denied, but as an object to be understood, even as it attempts to erase all understanding. When one begins to speculate on the form of something as strange and unlikely as an apocalypse, it is possible to start to identify characteristics, sometimes only as negative traits, but slowly and surely the thing starts to reveal its weird topology. Perhaps there is more than one apocalypse, or perhaps there are many small-scale apocalypses that participate in the evolution of everyday life.

»(You listening to) youtube.com/watch?v=QSza93W6n1M« proposes a move away from the traditional manner of seeing change as an event that descends from beyond and causes a rupture in the unfurling of lived time. The exhibition reveals an alternative strategy for thinking about the process of change and moves away from the model of the rupture or event to suggest an ecology of processes that form a complex, behavioural object. Like weather systems, and market bubbles, an apocalypse is unstable and responds to and is shaped by the things it comes in contact with. There is no post-apocalypse, you can only live in the unfurling heat of an emerging apocalyptic entity. Welcome to the apocalypse.

The exhibition is an invitation to see the apocalypse as a way of redefining all forms of revolution. Great change does not arrive from the outside alone, it absorbs everything in its way, joining with it and emerges anew as it does so. We join with the apocalypse and each other in newly possible, hybrid unions.

The material for the exhibition and the ideas presented in it were generated by an international group of artists during an intensive exchange in the isolated hills of the Plateau de Millevaches in rural France, home of the Tarnac 9 and the final resting place of Deleuze. Treignac Projet is a large scale artist initiated program dedicated towards collective and group approaches to art.

Annie Peters begins the speculation on life within the dynamics of the disaster with her Center for Education research dossier A Collaborative Approach to Progress (2012). The pedagogic background to the work and its intimation of the necessity of group vitality rather than individual authority, propel us into the heart of a debate on the value of knowledge that is generated rather than passed on. In the text of this work, it is clear that knowledge creation and social structure are tied to our ability to continue to exist and that the individual is perhaps an insufficient entity when preparing for contingency.

Sophia Pahud presents land-e-scape (2012), a photograph of her intervention at the abandoned site where the artists in this exhibition convened. Through it she reveals the location of her reflections as already housing previous calamities. The economic collapse of the industrial yarn factory and the gradual decay of its built infrastructure all precede the use of the site for artistic modes of thinking and continue to influence these mode’s evolution.

Niklas Tafra & Alia Pathan’s video work Petite Roque (2012) depicts a small community developing its own procedures within the confines of a closed and cut off time. Intrigued by the aestheicization of political gesture in the work of the French New Wave in the 1960’s, Niklas and Alia return to the question of the political potential of cinema and narrative.

Nick Carr’s image Articulation No.9 (2012) seems at first to possess organic qualities, but as one draws closer entering into the horizon of the image, it becomes clear that the image is totally generated at a digital level. Carr has developed a set of rules for the setting out of black or white pixels in a grid. As in the computational-evolution game, Life, a simple set of rules decide what colour each pixel will be. From this simple set of base rules, a complex form emerges, just as complex social behaviours emerge from simpler living units.

Black Mirror (2009) by Marc Geneix, a newspaper is saturated with black ink, but instead of obliterating the contents of the journal, the printed text and images surface as areas of sheen. Here the transformed contents of the journal reappear readable but obscured by the surface play of absorbed and printed ink. Geneix is engaged with what emerges in the process of entropy and how new orders are recuperated during the move through chaos.

Writer and curator Tom Trevatt’s poster-declaration Bye bye baby, you are my horizon, my only limit, the strange distance created and lost in the moment of our final destruction, let us not forget that there will be no more memory, no more mind, no more you and me, as you disappear in the fires of apocalypse we lose our anthro-morphological relation, there is no returning to the home that you used to provide (2011/12) claims to construct political propositions within the post-humanist field. Appropriating the form of a revolutionary declaration or a publicly nailed thesis, the poster proposes the moment of liminal (non-) existence as the basis for thinking about love.

Sam Basu working with Nick Carr and Friederike Hamann form the collaboration JVC. This project proceeds through the assemblage of their different working methods to produce video, text and objects. Their interest lies in the how cinematic space can produce hybrid or mutated frames for group exchanges and thinking. In Assemblage Cinematic Diagram (2012) they use the idea of disaster as a way to think about the sound or video loop, cycles of time and recursive progression.


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