March 3 – April 7, 2012




Friederike Hamann, Ayaka Okutsu, Paul Wiersbinski, Private Archive Rolf Keppler

Curated by
Ulrike Gerhardt, Susanne Husse, Jana Sotzko

•The Hollow Earth Show•

News about the Apocalypse #2

With the end of the world approaching, the second exhibition of our »News about the Apocalypse 2012« series takes us to the grey areas of science. »The Hollow Earth Show« turns our common view of the world upside down. What if the earth is hollow, and our idea of the world simply fiction? Only occasionally our thinking is located outside the mainstream of authorized discourses. The creation of alternative worlds has a long history in art and could prove to be of existential importance in view of the predicted apocalypse and collapse of the existing system.

One of the best-known alternative conceptions of the world is the hollow earth theory. Formulated originally in the 19th Century by the physician and esoteric Cyrus Teed, this idea can take on a beautifully radical form: beyond the famous (see Jules Verne) image of our planet as a hollow, is the notion of mankind living not on the outer, but the inner side of the sphere. Never accepted by official scientists, the idea still has some convinced supporters. One of the most fascinating consequences of this monadic world view is the image of all human actions and leftovers being locked in; forever circulating inside the sphere. The exhibited hollow earth model is part of Rolf Keppler’s private archive. Mr. Keppler (b. 1954) is the most noted proponent of the hollow earth theory in Germany.

In his Hollow Earth Installation artist Paul Wiersbinski (b. 1983) uses cardboards to organize an arced video screen. On this projection surface will be shown conversations between the artist and two proponents of the hollow earth theory: Helmut Diehl and Rolf Keppler. In addition, Paul Wiersbinski and Wieland Schönfelder will present their performance One Man Unit on the opening night: A hybrid creature, equipped with web clips of consumer culture and mobile projections, turns its surroundings into a holodeck and constructs bridges into another reality by means of visual informational pieces.

Japanese artist Ayaka Okutsu (b. 1982) will realize her thirty-minute performance Doggy digger in the public space of Senefelder Platz on the opening night, as well as the following Saturdays (5 p.m.). Dressed up as Doggy digger, a hybrid between a shepherd and a recycling station, she will supervise and direct the visitors through the adjacent surroundings. In the course of this performance she investigates the interrelation of subjects, knowledge and power. She uses symbols for the absurdity and the surplus of our knowledge-based society. Doggy digger only lives for the moment, digs into the earth and looks for the hardly digestible leftovers of science. That is until the end of the world in nine months, in which those will be smelled out and digested.

On the 27th of January, the first of a series of exhibitions will open at NOTE ON. With »News about the Apocalypse« we anticipate and celebrate the predicted end of the world on December 21st, 2012 as both an actual collapse and a new beginning. During the eleven months after January 20th, various models and systems will be tested. Currently disputed, these models and systems may be of use in the future. We investigate the borderlands of art and science, search for extraordinary methods of archiving, and implement historical and marginalized knowledge.

On occasion of every exhibition, an interesting association, club, organization or expert will be invited to present their own archive with reference to the curatorial question – like in the case of the »The Hollow Earth Show« it is the hollow earth theory proponent Mr. Rolf Keppler from Stuttgart. Over the entire span of the exhibition series, artist Friederike Hamann will develop Archive Scenes, a walk-in research station. It enables visitors to study related literature, as well as to add and copy material. Against the backdrop of the »The Hollow Earth Show« she visualized the exhibition-based content through an installation out of two parallel mirror planes – one hanging in the air, the other one lying on a working- and research table. The images and readable texts at the Archive Scenes #2 research station get duplicated endlessly. The expansion into the public sphere, an interdisciplinary dissolution of boundaries, and the question of how we want to act and archive in a new world define the NOTE ON program for 2012.

Picture: Oliver Corino Rees


Hollow EarthHollow EarthHollow EarthHollow EarthHollow EarthHollow EarthHollow EarthHollow EarthHollow EarthHollow EarthHollow EarthHollow EarthHollow EarthHollow EarthHollow EarthHollow Earth Show
Hollow Earth

Hollow Earth

Hollow Earth

Hollow Earth

Hollow Earth

Hollow Earth

Hollow Earth

Hollow Earth

Hollow Earth

Hollow Earth

Hollow Earth

Hollow Earth

Hollow Earth

Hollow Earth

Hollow Earth

Hollow Earth

Hollow Earth

Hollow Earth

Hollow Earth

Hollow Earth

Hollow Earth

Hollow Earth

Hollow Earth

Hollow Earth

Hollow Earth

Hollow Earth

Hollow Earth

Hollow Earth

Hollow Earth

Hollow Earth

Hollow Earth Show

Hollow Earth Show